The Galt Museum collects and preserves artifacts of permanent value to the study of the human history of Lethbridge and southwestern Alberta. Artifacts are collected from and donated by both public and private sources, and are available for viewing to researchers, by appointment. 


The artifacts are included in our Discovery Hall in the Permanent exhibit and, where possible, in our Special exhibits.

We are excited to offer our Collections database online and hope you'll be amazed at the treasures and their stories we hold in trust.

Donations

The Galt Museum & Archives actively collects and solicits new artifacts on a year round basis. The Galt, however, will not accept a donation if conditions are attached to the offer.

Donations are reviewed by communitybased Acquisitions Committee four times a year to determine the artifacts’ suitability relative to the mandate of the Galt Museum & Archives.

The committee also reviews the condition of the item and examines the existing collection to see if there are examples of similar items which already have been collected. If the item meets the Museum's criteria, the item is accepted into the collection.

This review process commonly takes from four to six months. If an artifact(s) is wanted for the Museum’s collection the donor will be informed and requested to sign a Certificate of Gift.

Endorsement of the Certificate transfers legal ownership of the artifact(s) to the Museum and to the City of Lethbridge.

Loans

The Galt Museum & Archives makes available for loan artifacts from its permanent collection and from its handson, teaching collection on a temporary, conditional basis.

The Galt reserves the right to refuse loan requests for reasons including conservation and applicant unsuitability.
Candidates must adhere to all loan contract conditions. These conditions include, but are not limited to, maintenance of a proper display/ storage environment, adherence to all security requests and proof of insurance should the artifact become lost, stolen or damaged.

Conditions relative to the loan of artifacts are more stringent than those which apply to objects of the teaching collection.
Portrait image for Kevin MacLean

Kevin MacLean Collections Technician